{Featured Author} Susan Louise Peterson, author of The Yes Book for Teenagers & The No Book for Teenagers – Win $25 Amazon GC!

Featured — By on August 9, 2013 at 11:30 pm

susan petersonSusan Louise Peterson is an author and school psychologist living in Las Vegas, NV. She has taken a twenty year journey working in the tough inner city schools of Las Vegas, Nevada as a teacher and later a school psychologist. Susan has worked with students from pre-kindergarten to high school levels. Working in a large inner city high school she noticed that many teenagers were dealing with communication issues related to their parents, teachers and other adults. Students were given limited information from adults when they asked questions and usually did not understand the ‘yes’ and ‘no’ type of responses they received from adults. In response, Susan Louise Peterson wrote two companion books to help teenagers with this communication dilemma. She is the author of the newly released books entitled THE YES BOOK FOR TEENAGERS and THE NO BOOK FOR TEENAGERS.

Susan is an award winning educator and has won several national awards for improving educational practice. She was named to the Practitioners Hall of Fame for Improvement of Educational Practice from NOVA University.

In addition, Susan is the author of the recently published book IS MY CHILD AUTISTIC OR DELAYED? (Vilnius Press-2013), as well as eight other books in the areas of education, research and child behavior.

You can visit her website at www.susanlouisepeterson.com.

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ABOUT THE YES BOOK FOR TEENAGERS

The Yes Book for Teenagers

The Yes Book for Teenagers was written to address the multiple meanings of ‘yes’ as teenagers often ask parents and adults for numerous requests. Susan Louise Peterson, a school psychologist has worked in the inner city high schools of Las Vegas with a large number of teenagers. She has seen the ‘quick and fast’ requests from teenagers. These requests when answered with a ‘yes’ response often need a little more explanation and detail. It is hoped this book will help teenagers understand the broader meaning of a simple ‘yes’ response.

Purchase your copy at AMAZON.

ABOUT THE NO BOOK FOR TEENAGERS

The No Book for Teenagers

The No Book for Teenagers seeks to help teenagers understand why adults (such as parents and teachers say ‘no’ to them. Teenagers literally have thousands’ of requests and these requests can cause major disagreements between teens and adults. Parents and teachers are often helping teenagers understand the ‘bigger picture’ and some of the challenges they may be facing now and in the future. The book is written by Susan Louise Peterson, a school psychologist who has worked with teens in the inner city schools of Las Vegas, Nevada. As Susan emphasizes in the book, the word ‘no’ can be connected to many things. She helps teens explore the various meanings connected with a ‘no’ response.

Purchase your copy at AMAZON.


giveaway

Pump Up Your Book & Susan Peterson is giving away one $25 Amazon Gift Card/Paypal Cash!
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Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • Three winners will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins August 10 and ends September 15.
  • Winner will be contacted via email on September 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

special appearances 2

 

Susan gives us her book publishing secrets at RED ROOM

Click here to read.

Susan talks about wanting a more independent publishing experience at BLOGHER

Click here to read.

What’s it like to see your book for the first time?  Susan tells us at THE WRITER’S LIFE

Click here to read.

What rituals do Susan follow when writing her books?  Find out at REVIEW FROM HERE.

Click here to read.

What has surprised Susan about the publishing industry?  She gives the bare facts at BEYOND THE BOOKS.

Click here to read.

Is it hard to get a nonfiction book published today?  Find out what Susan has to say about it at AS THE PAGES TURN.

Click here to read.

Find out why a ‘‘yes’ response from a parent or adult may be part of a bigger and more complex picture in an interview with Susan at PUMP UP YOUR BOOK.

Click here to read.

Susan tells us her greatest challenge writing her books at EXAMINER.

Click here to read.

Find out the story behind her book at THE STORY BEHIND THE BOOK.

Click here to read.

Are dreaming and reflecting on life important to a writer?  Find out what Susan says about it at LITERARILY SPEAKING.

Click here to read.

What is Susan’s least favorite part of the publishing process?  Find out at SALON.

Click here to read.

Susan gives tips for aspiring writers at GATHER.

Click here to read.

Pump Up Your Book

 

 

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    13 Comments

  • ELF says:

    I think it is toughest for teens to accept that they are growing yet don’t have all of the answers yet and still have to comply with someone else’s rules.

    Thanks for the giveaway and good luck with your new releases!

  • I think it’s hardest for teens to accept that there might be a better way to do something. That might go in line with the “idea” that they aren’t always right!

  • I think the hardest thing for teens to accept is that life goes on now matter what decisions you make, it will not stop because of something you did or did not do, and for that, one must suffer the consequences–good or bad.

  • apple blossom says:

    being different from the top dog

  • joe hawkshaw says:

    The hardest things for teens to accept i think in this day are doing drugs and drinking, it is hard to accept that because the pressures are worse today then when we where kids.

  • The hardest things for teens to accept is facing a reality and moving on.

  • Lisa Brown says:

    the hardest thing for teens to accept is that they can’t have everything.

  • latoya says:

    I think the hardest things for teens to accept is that it is okay to march to the beat of your own drum, you don’t have to do what everyone else is doing…do what feels right to you.

  • Maureen says:

    I think the hardest thing for them to accept is that they are not yet independent so they still have to answer to their parents or guardians.

  • Elle says:

    I think the hardest thing for teens to accept is that they are not as invincible as they like to think they are.

  • Amanda Sakovitz says:

    I think responsibility is the hardest thing

  • meredith says:

    I think their hardest thing is knowing their limits

  • Thomas Murphy says:

    That they can’t always get there way.

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